20 LOOKS TO THE FUTURE

20 LOOKS TO THE FUTURE

Charles Kettering said, “My interest is in the future because I’m going to spend the rest of my life there.” At C+F, we passed out crystal balls and asked for 20 glimpses into the future. You are cordially invited to travel through time with C+F’s intrepid futuristas (pictured below):

Charles Kettering said, “My interest is in the future because I’m going to spend the rest of my life there.” At C+F, we passed out crystal balls and asked for 20 glimpses into the future. You are cordially invited to travel through time with C+F’s intrepid futuristas (pictured below):

1. Talk Data to Me

As AI technologies like machine learning continue to mature and become more integrated into the industry, it’s going to become increasingly important for brands to respect consumers’ privacy and earn their trust. Current technology already enables us to collect an incredible amount of data about our audiences and draw some remarkable insights; in 10 years, the amount of information we’ll have access to could be downright scary. Advertisers will increasingly need to consider the ethics of how we use that data to ensure that these hyper-targeted, highly personalized ads don’t feel creepy or invasive to consumers. –Andrew Clementi

2. Fall of the TI-83

The year is 2068. Copacino+Fujikado has successfully defeated Skynet by harnessing the powers of empathy and humanity. Artificial Intelligence was no match for creativity, insight, and compassion. But efforts from the resistance have weakened the human race. Dogs inherit the Earth. –Carla Sparks

3. Earth: The Universe’s Hottest Attraction

It’s not a profound secret that we kind of broke this planet. When our next home is discovered (looking at you, Elon Musk/NASA/James Webb Space Telescope), the Earth will be preserved as a human history museum and wildlife preserve. –Sam Stuesser

4. Ye Olde Barter System

You’d be hard-pressed to find a tradesperson or creative that has not been offered exposure in lieu of actual monetary payment. In our current age, where Seattle City Light does not accept exposure bucks, this is a hollow offer. However, with global currency in flux, the future will see a lot more bartering in an official sense. The question becomes how to assign value to more abstract things. –Sam Stuesser

5. Drones and AI Will Usher in New Forms (and Quantities) of Storytelling

Content creators will get comfortable purchasing more and more hardware and software while hiring less and less human talent. Self-piloting drones will make the most challenging action shots cheap, safe and easy to capture. AI will assist in the articulation and development of storylines to optimize appeal to hyper-targeted audiences. –Dave Kurs

6. Blockchain Will Disrupt the Media Distribution Landscape

The use of blockchain technology will disintermediate media-buying organizations by removing the need for brokerage of ad space. Media professionals will focus more on planning, in an effort to best steward client media budgets. –Dave Kurs

7. Data Hoarders Is Not a Show on A&E

As hardware manufacturers find cheap and secure ways to store massive amounts of data using microscopic strands of DNA, the desire to store and analyze everything will become a foregone conclusion. No matter how seemingly irrelevant. Big Data tools maintained by AI will derive insights from the most unobvious data points. –Dave Kurs

8. Digital Controls Replace Self-Control

As our time continues to be dominated by devices and digital information overload, we will look to our devices to save us from ourselves. Like staring at a cake in the kitchen while trying to watch your weight, we will ultimately recognize the limits of personal willpower. Individually created “Personal Consumption Plans” will allow people to set limits on time spent on social media, binge watching, texting, emailing and video games via a single app that can shut down any digital distraction at work, in the car, at home or on the go. –Mike Hayward

9. Hot Career: Time Coach

With time management degrees in hand (a combination of psychology, anthropology, stress management, wellness and economics studies), Time Coaches (TCs) become all the rage among working professionals. TCs create minute-by-minute schedules for their clients that balance daily workload, screen time, exercise, meals, sleep requirements, family time, and downtime to maximize health, wellness and efficiency. Top tech firms and forward-thinking health plans cover the costs as part of a benefits packages designed to lure high-performers (a benefit that greatly reduces sick time and increases productivity). –Mike Hayward

10. The Rise of the Brand Philanthropy Agency

Young consumers are already insisting brands align with their personal values. As this trend continues to grow, it will give rise to dedicated brand philanthropy agencies to help brands seek out, vet and partner with charitable and non-profit groups that reflect their company philosophy. These agencies will also create consumer campaigns centered around the philanthropic partnerships that, in some cases, will replace all traditional brand advertising for a client. –Mike Hayward

11. Micro-Advertising

Digital and responsive out-of-home ads will continue to become more and more tailored to people’s individual habits, eventually leading to a place where billboards are just green screens and everyone sees ads that are unique to them. How? Well… –Paul Balcerak

12. The Eye-Phone

Google Glass fizzled, but like the Microsoft Tablet that eventually heralded the more popular iPad, a phone that’s attached to your face will come back strong. People will interact with their operating system via an augmented reality layout that’s projected into contact lenses and connected via Bluetooth (or a similar technology) to thin adhesive haptic sensors on their fingertips and barely perceptible ear buds. The technology will allow real-life environments to be customized to the user (e.g., the aforementioned green-screen billboards) so that your real life mirrors your digital life. –Paul Balcerak

13. Guaranteed Universal Income

As algorithms and robots continue to eat up jobs that were once performed by humans, unemployment and wealth inequity will grow to the point that most industrialized nations will need to start having the conversation about guaranteed income for every citizen. In the United States, this will almost certainly start at the grassroots level before bubbling up to the mainstream, perhaps in the form of a new labor-centric political party. –Paul Balcerak

14. Personal Robotics

Twentieth-century space travel unleashed a torrent of consumer goods, a fact that most people don’t even know about: cordless power tools, memory foam mattresses, telescoping ladders — all of these things were descended from NASA and DARPA tech that was developed through a need to travel faster and lighter. Space travel in the 21st-century will belong to robots, not humans. As asteroid mining comes online, robots will become more sophisticated and will eventually replace the need for humans on, for instance, the International Space Station to undertake dangerous spacewalks. Not long after, those robots will come down to Earth in the form of (affordable) self-driving lawn mowers, HVAC cleaners, plumbers and everything else imaginable. It’ll be like the Roomba on steroids. –Paul Balcerak

15. The A.I. Bill of Rights

As machines become more sophisticated, we’ll get closer and closer to the singularity where it’s hard to tell human from machine. Things will get a little weird by our current standards: people will date AI’s or operating systems (like in the movie Her). Or just form friendly relationships with them—social isolation is a huge health risk, and people who find themselves in that situation will benefit greatly from being able to interact with a human-like device. As this becomes normalized, we’ll see a push for machines to take on more rights. For instance: What happens to an elderly person’s AI companion when that human being dies? Especially when that AI is virtually indistinguishable from a human being? –Paul Balcerak

16. Sci-Fi Movies Reclassified as Documentaries

As technology evolves at a rapid pace, science fiction films will be reclassified as documentaries. Check out these not-so-far-fetched IMDb descriptions: –Cameron Wicker

Soylent Green (1973): In the world ravaged by the greenhouse effect and overpopulation, an NYPD detective investigates the murder of a big company CEO.
WarGames (1983): A young man finds a back door into a military central computer in which reality is confused with game-playing, possibly starting World War III.
Total Recall (1990): When a man goes for virtual vacation memories of the planet Mars, an unexpected and harrowing series of events forces him to go to the planet for real–or does he?
Jurassic Park (1993): During a preview tour, a theme park suffers a major power breakdown that allows its cloned dinosaur exhibits to run amok.
Gattaca (1997): A genetically inferior man assumes the identity of a superior one in order to pursue his lifelong dream of space travel.
The Matrix (1999): A computer hacker learns from mysterious rebels about the true nature of his reality and his role in the war against its controllers.

17. The Meaning of Work

With discrete tasks increasingly taken care of by robots, workers will need to come to terms with an evolving idea of “work.” As some humans are freed to spend more time creatively, others will see their jobs disappear. Occupation as identity will shift and blur, as governments, corporations and social organizations scramble to address anchorless swathes of the population. –Katie O’Mara

18. Growing Pains at Snap, Inc.

Snapchat has the “it” factor but now the struggle to maintain begins. Are they in a bad place? No, they’ve become a leader in a space with product ideas that revolutionize communication behaviors–ephemeral messaging, AR face filters, daily stories. Are they in a good place? No, the user experience is inherently difficult to monetize, causing an existential crisis on the business side. They’ll continue to find themselves in perpetual purgatory—having very cool products that many want, but having a tough time monetizing and selling back to advertisers while competitors crib from their innovative efforts with greater business success. –Calvin Grover

19. Politics of the Internet Generation

As more and more future politicians have a digital footprint to follow them society will be forced to accept that most people in office aren’t, in fact, beacons of moral superiority. Candidates will try to take down their opponents by digging up old tweets and Facebook status posts from the regrettable teenage years. We’ll start to see politicians who have hosted vlogs on YouTube since their early years in office. Presidential candidates will no long spend as much time on the campaign trail and will instead focus their energies on connecting with potential voters over the internet. –Emily Bishop

20. Integrated Health Care

Another one that you are already seeing the beginnings of as health care companies consolidate and acquire, in addition to tech companies entering the space. Tech companies can bring a level of efficiency to the industry. In addition, there is a lot of valuable insight to be gained as companies work toward implementing and evaluating the data they can pull from devices, records, purchase history, etc. This can result in cost savings and prevention. –Dimitri Perera

20 LOOKS TO THE FUTURE

20 LOOKS TO THE FUTURE

Charles Kettering said, “My interest is in the future because I’m going to spend the rest of my life there.” At C+F, we passed out crystal balls and asked for 20 glimpses into the future. You are cordially invited to travel through time with C+F’s intrepid futuristas (pictured below):

Charles Kettering said, “My interest is in the future because I’m going to spend the rest of my life there.” At C+F, we passed out crystal balls and asked for 20 glimpses into the future. You are cordially invited to travel through time with C+F’s intrepid futuristas (pictured below):

1. Talk Data to Me

As AI technologies like machine learning continue to mature and become more integrated into the industry, it’s going to become increasingly important for brands to respect consumers’ privacy and earn their trust. Current technology already enables us to collect an incredible amount of data about our audiences and draw some remarkable insights; in 10 years, the amount of information we’ll have access to could be downright scary. Advertisers will increasingly need to consider the ethics of how we use that data to ensure that these hyper-targeted, highly personalized ads don’t feel creepy or invasive to consumers. –Andrew Clementi

2. Fall of the TI-83

The year is 2068. Copacino+Fujikado has successfully defeated Skynet by harnessing the powers of empathy and humanity. Artificial Intelligence was no match for creativity, insight, and compassion. But efforts from the resistance have weakened the human race. Dogs inherit the Earth. –Carla Sparks

3. Earth: The Universe’s Hottest Attraction

It’s not a profound secret that we kind of broke this planet. When our next home is discovered (looking at you, Elon Musk/NASA/James Webb Space Telescope), the Earth will be preserved as a human history museum and wildlife preserve. –Sam Stuesser

4. Ye Olde Barter System

You’d be hard-pressed to find a tradesperson or creative that has not been offered exposure in lieu of actual monetary payment. In our current age, where Seattle City Light does not accept exposure bucks, this is a hollow offer. However, with global currency in flux, the future will see a lot more bartering in an official sense. The question becomes how to assign value to more abstract things. –Sam Stuesser

5. Drones and AI Will Usher in New Forms (and Quantities) of Storytelling

Content creators will get comfortable purchasing more and more hardware and software while hiring less and less human talent. Self-piloting drones will make the most challenging action shots cheap, safe and easy to capture. AI will assist in the articulation and development of storylines to optimize appeal to hyper-targeted audiences. –Dave Kurs

6. Blockchain Will Disrupt the Media Distribution Landscape

The use of blockchain technology will disintermediate media-buying organizations by removing the need for brokerage of ad space. Media professionals will focus more on planning, in an effort to best steward client media budgets. –Dave Kurs

7. Data Hoarders Is Not a Show on A&E

As hardware manufacturers find cheap and secure ways to store massive amounts of data using microscopic strands of DNA, the desire to store and analyze everything will become a foregone conclusion. No matter how seemingly irrelevant. Big Data tools maintained by AI will derive insights from the most unobvious data points. –Dave Kurs

8. Digital Controls Replace Self-Control

As our time continues to be dominated by devices and digital information overload, we will look to our devices to save us from ourselves. Like staring at a cake in the kitchen while trying to watch your weight, we will ultimately recognize the limits of personal willpower. Individually created “Personal Consumption Plans” will allow people to set limits on time spent on social media, binge watching, texting, emailing and video games via a single app that can shut down any digital distraction at work, in the car, at home or on the go. –Mike Hayward

9. Hot Career: Time Coach

With time management degrees in hand (a combination of psychology, anthropology, stress management, wellness and economics studies), Time Coaches (TCs) become all the rage among working professionals. TCs create minute-by-minute schedules for their clients that balance daily workload, screen time, exercise, meals, sleep requirements, family time, and downtime to maximize health, wellness and efficiency. Top tech firms and forward-thinking health plans cover the costs as part of a benefits packages designed to lure high-performers (a benefit that greatly reduces sick time and increases productivity). –Mike Hayward

10. The Rise of the Brand Philanthropy Agency

Young consumers are already insisting brands align with their personal values. As this trend continues to grow, it will give rise to dedicated brand philanthropy agencies to help brands seek out, vet and partner with charitable and non-profit groups that reflect their company philosophy. These agencies will also create consumer campaigns centered around the philanthropic partnerships that, in some cases, will replace all traditional brand advertising for a client. –Mike Hayward

11. Micro-Advertising

Digital and responsive out-of-home ads will continue to become more and more tailored to people’s individual habits, eventually leading to a place where billboards are just green screens and everyone sees ads that are unique to them. How? Well… –Paul Balcerak

12. The Eye-Phone

Google Glass fizzled, but like the Microsoft Tablet that eventually heralded the more popular iPad, a phone that’s attached to your face will come back strong. People will interact with their operating system via an augmented reality layout that’s projected into contact lenses and connected via Bluetooth (or a similar technology) to thin adhesive haptic sensors on their fingertips and barely perceptible ear buds. The technology will allow real-life environments to be customized to the user (e.g., the aforementioned green-screen billboards) so that your real life mirrors your digital life. –Paul Balcerak

13. Guaranteed Universal Income

As algorithms and robots continue to eat up jobs that were once performed by humans, unemployment and wealth inequity will grow to the point that most industrialized nations will need to start having the conversation about guaranteed income for every citizen. In the United States, this will almost certainly start at the grassroots level before bubbling up to the mainstream, perhaps in the form of a new labor-centric political party. –Paul Balcerak

14. Personal Robotics

Twentieth-century space travel unleashed a torrent of consumer goods, a fact that most people don’t even know about: cordless power tools, memory foam mattresses, telescoping ladders — all of these things were descended from NASA and DARPA tech that was developed through a need to travel faster and lighter. Space travel in the 21st-century will belong to robots, not humans. As asteroid mining comes online, robots will become more sophisticated and will eventually replace the need for humans on, for instance, the International Space Station to undertake dangerous spacewalks. Not long after, those robots will come down to Earth in the form of (affordable) self-driving lawn mowers, HVAC cleaners, plumbers and everything else imaginable. It’ll be like the Roomba on steroids. –Paul Balcerak

15. The A.I. Bill of Rights

As machines become more sophisticated, we’ll get closer and closer to the singularity where it’s hard to tell human from machine. Things will get a little weird by our current standards: people will date AI’s or operating systems (like in the movie Her). Or just form friendly relationships with them—social isolation is a huge health risk, and people who find themselves in that situation will benefit greatly from being able to interact with a human-like device. As this becomes normalized, we’ll see a push for machines to take on more rights. For instance: What happens to an elderly person’s AI companion when that human being dies? Especially when that AI is virtually indistinguishable from a human being? –Paul Balcerak

16. Sci-Fi Movies Reclassified as Documentaries

As technology evolves at a rapid pace, science fiction films will be reclassified as documentaries. Check out these not-so-far-fetched IMDb descriptions: –Cameron Wicker

Soylent Green (1973): In the world ravaged by the greenhouse effect and overpopulation, an NYPD detective investigates the murder of a big company CEO.
WarGames (1983): A young man finds a back door into a military central computer in which reality is confused with game-playing, possibly starting World War III.
Total Recall (1990): When a man goes for virtual vacation memories of the planet Mars, an unexpected and harrowing series of events forces him to go to the planet for real–or does he?
Jurassic Park (1993): During a preview tour, a theme park suffers a major power breakdown that allows its cloned dinosaur exhibits to run amok.
Gattaca (1997): A genetically inferior man assumes the identity of a superior one in order to pursue his lifelong dream of space travel.
The Matrix (1999): A computer hacker learns from mysterious rebels about the true nature of his reality and his role in the war against its controllers.

17. The Meaning of Work

With discrete tasks increasingly taken care of by robots, workers will need to come to terms with an evolving idea of “work.” As some humans are freed to spend more time creatively, others will see their jobs disappear. Occupation as identity will shift and blur, as governments, corporations and social organizations scramble to address anchorless swathes of the population. –Katie O’Mara

18. Growing Pains at Snap, Inc.

Snapchat has the “it” factor but now the struggle to maintain begins. Are they in a bad place? No, they’ve become a leader in a space with product ideas that revolutionize communication behaviors–ephemeral messaging, AR face filters, daily stories. Are they in a good place? No, the user experience is inherently difficult to monetize, causing an existential crisis on the business side. They’ll continue to find themselves in perpetual purgatory—having very cool products that many want, but having a tough time monetizing and selling back to advertisers while competitors crib from their innovative efforts with greater business success. –Calvin Grover

19. Politics of the Internet Generation

As more and more future politicians have a digital footprint to follow them society will be forced to accept that most people in office aren’t, in fact, beacons of moral superiority. Candidates will try to take down their opponents by digging up old tweets and Facebook status posts from the regrettable teenage years. We’ll start to see politicians who have hosted vlogs on YouTube since their early years in office. Presidential candidates will no long spend as much time on the campaign trail and will instead focus their energies on connecting with potential voters over the internet. –Emily Bishop

20. Integrated Health Care

Another one that you are already seeing the beginnings of as health care companies consolidate and acquire, in addition to tech companies entering the space. Tech companies can bring a level of efficiency to the industry. In addition, there is a lot of valuable insight to be gained as companies work toward implementing and evaluating the data they can pull from devices, records, purchase history, etc. This can result in cost savings and prevention. –Dimitri Perera